Blog

Moses Atticizing

“For what is Plato, but Moses atticizing?” —Numenius
τί γάρ ἐστι Πλάτων ἢ Μωσῆς ἀττικίζων;

On a somewhat different topic, Jonathan looks into the recent American novelist, David Foster Wallace, and his thesis on the role of narratives, the imprisonment of the postmodern self, religious ritual, and attention. The first in a series of posts, I suggest this ties into a similar theme in Plato as well.

Antonio provides some Thomistic inspired reflections to defend that God loves and directs the lives of all, even the reprobate. This is the good news of hell. (Part I of II)

Conor tries his hand as a commentator. He begins with the first chapter of 5.1

Antonio discusses how he changed his views on his vocation as a metaphysician: is it the priesthood or is it rather action as a public intellectual?

Jonathan contemplates the nature of philosophy as an ongoing, open-ended activity of thought, critiquing, and continual re-assessing, through the frame of Dominic O’Meara’s notion of “Plato’s Open Philosophy”.

Conor reflects on what he learned from Lloyd Gerson’s excellent Aristotle and Other Platonists.

Antonio provides a summary of Proclus’ psychology, cosmology and metaphysics for those new to Proclus.

Julio Cabrera claims that being lacks value in a way that it is improper to say that “evil exists”. Antonio presents his ontology as an important contribution to understanding the fallenness of the world.

In this post I talk about about the perception of pagan philosophy in relation to divine Christian revelation as the criteron of certain truth for late Byzantine Christians.

In this post Conor explores an unlikely friendship between Plato and the sage of Königsberg.